Dealer Resources

Where can Apple sell cars?

The year 2020 is slated to be an epic one for the auto industry.  By then, Tesla plans to have a ‘gigafactory’ capable of producing enough batteries for 500,000 electric vehicles, the seven major automotive manufacturers (including Musk’s juggernaut) will be selling driverless cars and Apple is going to release a car to sell along with its phone and watch. Or so they say.

Apple is not only the richest company in the world, they’re also known as one of the most secretive. Nobody knows whether or not they will actually manufacture and ship a car, but there is enough evidence to suggest that they are seriously considering it. We won’t lie, we’re excited about it, so we decided to join in the speculation.

Last year, we made an infographic asking the question “Can Tesla sell cars in my state?” In order for a state to be able to sell Teslas, the state would need to meet two criteria: first, direct sales from manufacturer to consumer would have to be legal and second, the state would need to have at least one Tesla showroom.

In our Apple infographic we broke it down in similar fashion.  The 25 blue states represent those where direct to consumer selling is legal, while red states are those where it is illegal.  The size of the apple icon indicates how many stores Apple already has in that state. There are only five states that do not have Apple stores yet: Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming.

can apple sell cars in my state mojo motors infographic

If Apple starts manufacturing cars, they will encounter many of the same obstacles that have plagued Tesla. Fortunately for them, Tesla will have already fought many of the the tough battles. For example, New Jersey just passed a law allowing direct sales to consumers. Other states like Texas are fighting to overturn bans on direct sales as well.

In terms of making sales, Tesla uses its showrooms to generate interest, but in states like Texas they can’t actually complete the transaction in-store. Interested customers are required to make the purchase online. The internet selling allows Tesla to reach customers who live in states where direct sales are banned since an online sale technically gets registered as a sale in California, Tesla’s home state.

tesla showroom mall mojo motorsGiven the amount of time and money Tesla is investing to build more showrooms and lobby for the legalization of direct sales, it’s obvious that traditional retail is crucial to Tesla’s growth strategy. Tesla currently sells tens of thousands of cars a year, but it will have to increase its presence on the ground if it wants to reach the masses and compete with the likes of Mercedes and BMW.

Thanks to the leaders such as Steve Jobs and Micky Drexler, Apple is already a leader in both ecommerce and brick and mortar sales. In many ways Tesla has borrowed from Apple’s retail strategy. Like Apple, Tesla’s showrooms are located in prime, high-traffic locations such as luxury malls and metropolitan hubs. They’re also staffed with knowledgable product experts who aren’t pushy salespeople. 

iPhone 5 models are pictured on display at an Apple Store in Pasadena, California

For those that choose to buy the iPhone or the Model S, it’s not about the cost, rather it’s the love of the product that ultimately drives the purchase decision. Apple knows how to design and market products. This is why they’ve been so successful, and much of their success is due to their stores.  Apple lets customers play with and test the products as much as they want.  If Apple produces a car, one would imagine that Apple stores would serve as a showroom where potential buyers could test it out just as they can with any Apple product.

If they choose to go with this strategy, Apple has a big head start.  They already have storefronts in 45 states while Tesla only has stores in 21 states.

If Apple shipped a car today, the company could only sell directly to consumers in 25 states (the blue states on the map). Tesla supporters are already working full-on to increase that number. New Jersey represents a major win, and if Texas overturns the direct sales ban as well, that will be another huge win for Tesla and perhaps Apple too.

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Written by Sam Jackson

Infographic by Sam Jackson

Image Credits: Tesla, Apple 

General Motors 2014 Recalls Infographic

Updated August 13, 2014
Updated July 24, 2014
Updated June 30, 2014

In the first half of 2014, General Motors recalled more cars than it sold in the last five years according to this article. Between the lawsuits, hearings at Capital Hill, internal investigations, delivering new parts to dealers, getting drivers to bring in their recalled cars – this is the general state of General Motors.

Logo of GM Recalls Cobalt

The automaker, already fined a maximum of $35 million, is looking at an even larger settlement expected to be in the billions. Just last month in May of 2014, Toyota agreed to pay $1.2 billion for misleading consumers and the government on their own recalls. [keep reading]

Do you LOVE or HATE your car?

Would you recommend your car to a friend? (1 being least likely, 5 being most likely)

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Shoppers care more about bulletproofed trucks than recalls

A few months back we studied over 35,000 emails to dealerships on Mojo Motors from shoppers interesting in buying a car. What we found was shoppers don’t care about recalls. Only two people asked about them. That’s right, only .005 percent of people asked about recalls. Since that article was published, there have been something like a billion more vehicle recalls and that’s not counting those GM recalls.

truck-with-bullet-holesShoppers now must really be wary of open recalls on used cars. They aren’t. In a study of nearly 20,000 new email leads to dealers since May, not a single person mentioned the word recall. Most people don’t even ask questions as the majority of people (81 percent) use the stock email message. Here’s what everyone else (19 percent) wanted to know. [keep reading]

Every car name categorized

Have you ever wondered what the name of your car means or maybe how manufacturers come up with names? After all, we say names like Camry, Miata and Passat without pausing to think if those names have a meaning. Turns out almost every car name has some significance that can be grouped into 12 categories.

what does the name of your car mean

Our study looked at 215 models, but there were exclusions. We left out some discontinued models and models with letter-number naming conventions used by BMW, Lexus and Mercedes. [keep reading]

When will you be able to buy a driverless car?

We recently published this popular infographic about the states where driverless cars are legal. While researching, we discovered there are a lot of different predictions around when the average person will actually be able to buy a self-driving car. Some automakers are already selling cars with self-driving technology. Others are predicting they will have a full lineup of self-driving cars in just over a decade. We took predictions from experts and automakers and put it all together in one beautiful infographic.

Make sure to click on the infographic below for the full-size view.
infographic design self driving cars

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So how realistic are these predictions? The march towards autonomous cars is inevitable, but the obstacles facing the automotive industry before driverless cars reach consumers are immense. These obstacles include technology, social attitudes, legislation and infrastructure. [keep reading]

Cheapest states to buy a car

“The price you see is the price you pay” said every car dealer ever at some point.  That isn’t really the whole truth because a price tag that might fit comfortably within your budget doesn’t factor in the taxes and dealer fees. Once those costs are added into the final price, you might be thousands over budget! See how much extra you might be paying in your state below.

Most Expensive States to Buy a Car with Fees and Taxes Infographic

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And these aren’t the only fees you’ll face either. We’ve listed out the six most common dealer fees here since each dealer approaches fees a bit differently. For the purposes of the this study and the infographic above, we honed in on state and local taxes, registration fees and dealer documentation fees. The costs were calculated based on a used car listed for sale at $16,500. That’s about the average price for a 2011 Honda Accord, one of the most followed cars on

So what are state and local taxes, registration fees and dealer doc fees? Here’s an explanation of each. [keep reading]

What everyone was talking about at #DD16

Mojo Motors Founder & CEO Paul Nadjarian spoke to a crowd of over one hundred dealership managers and owners during his Digital Dealer 16 session called “The biggest miss in your digital marketing strategy.” The event was held from April 6 to 8 in Atlantic City and is one of the prominent dealership conventions addressing the changing consumer trends and opportunities for the auto industry to increase walk-in and web traffic, along with proven methods to improve customer experience, spur more car sales and motivate employees.


View Paul’s Deck Here

So what was the biggest miss? Alerts. Dealerships aren’t leveraging the power of alerts to push shoppers through the funnel, influence purchase decision and create an urgency to buy. Alerts are used in the flight and real estate industries, but automotive is lagging behind. In fact, if you consider alerts to be web 2.0, the auto industry is still stuck in web 1.0. [keep reading]

Car shoppers don’t care about recalls

Before you get all angry about the link bait title, try this stat on for size. Since April 13th, 2014 there have been nearly 350,000 Tweets with the word “recall” according to Topsy. This doesn’t even come close to the nearly 800,000 Tweets containing the word “vampire” or 1.4M Tweets containing the word “taco.” Tweets about recalls does, however, beat the 49 Tweets containing “vampire taco.”

Tweets of Recalls Tacos Vampires GraphUsing social queues like keywords isn’t totally indicative of what shoppers care about, so we went further. In a study of over 35,000 email leads to car dealerships on, only two people asked about a vehicle recall. TWO! That’s .005 percent! This is interesting because as automakers continue breaking records left and right by recalling millions of vehicles for anything from spiders to electronic issues, shoppers still don’t care. If they do care about recalls, they definitely aren’t showing it in Tweets or emails to dealers. It would seem recalls are more important to the small number of people directly affected by said recalls, the government and the media. [keep reading]

Mojo Motors Founder & CEO Speaking at #DD16

Paul Nadjarian Alt Head ShotThe Founder and CEO of Mojo Motors, Paul Nadjarian, will be presenting at the 16th Digital Dealer Conference & Exposition in Atlantic City at Harrah’s Resort on Tuesday, May 7th from 2:00-2:50PM in Room 314.

Paul’s presentation is titled ‘Biggest Miss in Your Digital Marketing Strategy’ and will take a look at how dealers can leverage online tools to increase sales. The internet is shifting from browsing-based platforms to alert-based platforms. The increased penetration of mobile is accelerating this shift. Learn why alerts are the future, strategies to be more intelligent with your digital marketing and how to use alerts to drive more urgency and close more sales. There will be a case study on the evolution and shift to alerts in other industries. The workshop will also show how these trends apply to automotive and your dealership.

See Paul in Room 314 from 2:00 – 2:50PM on Wednesday, May 7, 2014. Check out the 16th Digital Dealer website here.

About Digital Dealer

The Digital Dealer Conference & Exposition is the premier educational conference and exposition dedicated to internet and technology solutions for automotive professionals.

About Mojo Motors

Mojo Motors is an automotive classified website launched in 2010. Shoppers ‘Follow’ used cars to get alerts when dealers drop prices or add cars to their inventory. The website is free to car shoppers and dealers pay a monthly fee.

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