Where can Apple sell cars?

The year 2020 is slated to be an epic one for the auto industry.  By then, Tesla plans to have a ‘gigafactory’ capable of producing enough batteries for 500,000 electric vehicles, the seven major automotive manufacturers (including Musk’s juggernaut) will be selling driverless cars and Apple is going to release a car to sell along with its phone and watch. Or so they say.

Apple is not only the richest company in the world, they’re also known as one of the most secretive. Nobody knows whether or not they will actually manufacture and ship a car, but there is enough evidence to suggest that they are seriously considering it. We won’t lie, we’re excited about it, so we decided to join in the speculation.

Last year, we made an infographic asking the question “Can Tesla sell cars in my state?” In order for a state to be able to sell Teslas, the state would need to meet two criteria: first, direct sales from manufacturer to consumer would have to be legal and second, the state would need to have at least one Tesla showroom.

In our Apple infographic we broke it down in similar fashion.  The 25 blue states represent those where direct to consumer selling is legal, while red states are those where it is illegal.  The size of the apple icon indicates how many stores Apple already has in that state. There are only five states that do not have Apple stores yet: Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming.

can apple sell cars in my state mojo motors infographic

If Apple starts manufacturing cars, they will encounter many of the same obstacles that have plagued Tesla. Fortunately for them, Tesla will have already fought many of the the tough battles. For example, New Jersey just passed a law allowing direct sales to consumers. Other states like Texas are fighting to overturn bans on direct sales as well.

In terms of making sales, Tesla uses its showrooms to generate interest, but in states like Texas they can’t actually complete the transaction in-store. Interested customers are required to make the purchase online. The internet selling allows Tesla to reach customers who live in states where direct sales are banned since an online sale technically gets registered as a sale in California, Tesla’s home state.

tesla showroom mall mojo motorsGiven the amount of time and money Tesla is investing to build more showrooms and lobby for the legalization of direct sales, it’s obvious that traditional retail is crucial to Tesla’s growth strategy. Tesla currently sells tens of thousands of cars a year, but it will have to increase its presence on the ground if it wants to reach the masses and compete with the likes of Mercedes and BMW.

Thanks to the leaders such as Steve Jobs and Micky Drexler, Apple is already a leader in both ecommerce and brick and mortar sales. In many ways Tesla has borrowed from Apple’s retail strategy. Like Apple, Tesla’s showrooms are located in prime, high-traffic locations such as luxury malls and metropolitan hubs. They’re also staffed with knowledgable product experts who aren’t pushy salespeople. 

iPhone 5 models are pictured on display at an Apple Store in Pasadena, California

For those that choose to buy the iPhone or the Model S, it’s not about the cost, rather it’s the love of the product that ultimately drives the purchase decision. Apple knows how to design and market products. This is why they’ve been so successful, and much of their success is due to their stores.  Apple lets customers play with and test the products as much as they want.  If Apple produces a car, one would imagine that Apple stores would serve as a showroom where potential buyers could test it out just as they can with any Apple product.

If they choose to go with this strategy, Apple has a big head start.  They already have storefronts in 45 states while Tesla only has stores in 21 states.

If Apple shipped a car today, the company could only sell directly to consumers in 25 states (the blue states on the map). Tesla supporters are already working full-on to increase that number. New Jersey represents a major win, and if Texas overturns the direct sales ban as well, that will be another huge win for Tesla and perhaps Apple too.

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Written by Sam Jackson

Infographic by Sam Jackson

Image Credits: Tesla, Apple 

Where can Tesla sell cars?

Updated on November 4, 2014 – Direct sales banned in AZ and WV, new service stations, superchargers and galleries opened

We saw one of the first used Tesla Model S sedans go up for sale last week and it got us thinking, where can you buy, supercharge or service a Tesla these days? We scoured the internet and bribed our design team to put it all together in a sweet infographic – enjoy!

Mojo Motors Tesla Infographic Nov 4 14Click here to download a hi-res version of this infographic. Feel free to share.


States that Ban Direct Sales: 26

States that Allow Tesla to Sell Cars: 22

States Tesla is Fighting to Overturn Ban: 2


Manufacturer direct sales are banned in the red states. Tesla can have service centers, superchargers and stores and galleries in these states but cannot sell or deliver cars. For example, you can check out a Tesla at Short Hills Mall in New Jersey, but you cannot take a test drive or discuss pricing with a salesperson. If you want to purchase a car, you would have to buy at and then arrange a delivery. On March 15, 2014 Ohio passed a bill that will allow Tesla to sell its electric cars but it’s waiting to be signed into law by Governor Kasich. Read about it here.

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Written by Max Katsarelas

Auto Insurance Minimums by State

old timey car crash mojo motors blog

We have been crashing cars as long as we have been building them. And we’ve made a lot more progress with the building than we have with the crashing. State car insurance minimums are in the news right now because Arizona is considering a bill to increase the required insurance minimums in their state. This is important because when the amount of damage in an accident exceeds what’s covered under the insurance policy the driver is often liable and it can result in catastrophic financial damage and often bankruptcy. [keep reading]

General Motors 2014 Recalls Infographic

Updated August 13, 2014
Updated July 24, 2014
Updated June 30, 2014

In the first half of 2014, General Motors recalled more cars than it sold in the last five years according to this article. Between the lawsuits, hearings at Capital Hill, internal investigations, delivering new parts to dealers, getting drivers to bring in their recalled cars – this is the general state of General Motors.

Logo of GM Recalls Cobalt

The automaker, already fined a maximum of $35 million, is looking at an even larger settlement expected to be in the billions. Just last month in May of 2014, Toyota agreed to pay $1.2 billion for misleading consumers and the government on their own recalls. [keep reading]

Uber’s toughest year yet

There are many ride sharing services that provide an alternative to traditional taxi cabs, but none larger than Uber. With backing from big names like Google Ventures, Goldman Sachs and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Uber has expanded globally and asserted its dominance in cities across the United States. They’re now worth an estimated $40 billion and still growing. But monumental growth does not come without growing pains.


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The same aggressive business and marketing strategies that made Uber a success have also got them into trouble several times this year. From shady business tactics, to neglecting passenger safety, to privacy issues, Uber has gotten almost as much bad publicity in 2014 as General Motors, the undisputed recall champ.

That’s why we’ve put together this infographic that shows the company’s public relations missteps throughout 2014. [keep reading]

Most expensive tolls in the United States

Nobody likes paying tolls, but they are a necessary evil. The money from tolls is used to fund the construction of new roadways, as well as maintenance. Unless you live in one of the 22 states that don’t collect tolls, or a state where you can get by without owning a car, you have no other choice but to pony up and pay the toll.

Most toll roads cost under ten cents per mile, but the price of tolls on a long road trip can add up quickly. At the end of your journey, you could easily spend $50 in tolls…or more. There are some toll roads you should watch out for and they can add up to as much as $1.25 per mile. The cost is even greater for bridges and tunnels. Hopefully you don’t have to pay any of these tolls on your commute or live in a state with high gas taxes. [keep reading]

Driverless Ubers could drop fares over 75%

The driverless car will improve traffic, make roadways safer, reduce traffic fatalities, increase productivity and one more thing, save people A LOT of money. In places like San Francisco and New York City, the introduction of a self driving taxi or Uber could reduce fares over 75 percent! That ride from Brooklyn to the Lower East Side will go from $20 to $5 and you won’t even have to worry about tipping.

If a fleet of driverless cars were to take over the highways and byways, people might not even need to own cars. This means no more insurance, no more paying for gas and no more service appointments to get the oil changed. For the millions of people who are paying thousands of dollars to own a car, this number might drop to just a couple hundred dollars for a driverless car membership. [keep reading]

7 companies to launch driverless cars by 2020

We already showed you when you will be able to buy a driverless car using predictions from research companies and futurists. Since that article was published in July, automakers have been announcing when they anticipate to release their driverless vehicles. This was mostly done to ride the viral wave after Google’s driverless car video was released. So, which company is going to be first to deliver an autonomous model to showrooms?

We’ve grouped companies into four categories:

  1. Expected to launch a driverless car by 2020
  2. Expected to launch a driverless car after 2020
  3. Developing a driverless car, but no official launch date
  4. No expected launch of a driverless car

Companies in the first category have announced they will have a driverless car by 2020. To be considered “driverless,” the car must drive itself with no assistance from a person. As it stands, nearly all automakers have some sort of driverless technology in their vehicles, like adaptive cruise control and lane-keep assist. These features aid a driver, it doesn’t make a car totally autonomous.

Our infographic also didn’t account for the fact driverless cars are probably illegal in your state. Even Elon Musk has said the technology for driverless cars will be here by 2020, but legislation around driverless cars probably won’t be passed until 2022 or 2023. So if you can’t drive, hopefully you live in one of these states or have decent mass transit. [keep reading]

States saving the most money on gas

Oil prices are falling sharply and lower oil prices leads to lower gas prices. Before you buy that SUV you always wanted, you might want to find out how much you can really save. We already told you about states with the highest gas tax, but now we figured out what states are benefiting the most from the recent drop in gas prices. To find this out, we looked at a few metrics like miles driven per year and gas prices based on the 2014 high and low as of October 2014.

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The data around gas prices came from the website, a terrific resource for looking at gas prices by state or city. They also have a cool app that helps you find the cheapest gas near you. The breakdown of the average miles driven by state came from a study conducted by US Public Interest Research Groups.

Top 10 States Saving the Most

Indiana – $515.21
Alabama – $507.53
Ohio – $504.40
Mississippi – $449.37
Kentucky – $441.10
Georgia – $425.98
Michigan – $420.70
Tennessee – $415.44
Missouri – $407.98
Delaware – $393.10

We determined these states are saving the most by dividing average miles driven per year by the average miles per gallon and then multiplying by the decrease in price. Simple, right? We assumed the average miles per gallon was 20. The less fuel efficient your car is, the more you will save. Let’s say you live in Indiana and drive an old Suburban, you could save over $700 if gas prices stay flat. If they fall more, you save more.

So why are these states saving the most? Well, it’s a few of different reasons. Either these states have a high gas tax, their drivers put more miles on their cars each year than other drivers in other states or the price of gas just dropped more. Take Michigan or Indiana, for example, with a gas tax above 40 cents per gallon of gas. As gas prices go down, so does the amount a state is pulling in on taxes. States like Alabama or Missouri have some of the most well-traveled citizens, logging over 11,000 miles behind the wheel each year.

Now let’s pause for Kanye to make it rain.

States with Biggest Drop in Gas Prices

Ohio – 26%
Indiana – 22%
Michigan – 22%
Delaware – 21%
Tennessee – 21%
South Carolina – 21%
Kentucky – 21%
Alabama – 21%
Georgia – 21%
Illinois – 21%
California – 21%

Just because these states have the biggest drop in gas prices, doesn’t mean drivers are actually saving the most. In California where gas prices are among the highest in the country, a 21% drop still might not be a relief for drivers. On the flip side, in South Carolina where gas prices are the lowest in the nation, that extra 21% probably makes gas seem practically free.

Now that you know the states saving the most and which have seen gas prices drop more than anywhere else, let’s look at the losers.

Gas Station Prices Are Too High

Top 10 States Saving the Least

Hawaii – $127.77
Alaska – $156.02
New York – $176.19
Utah – $203.85
District of Columbia – $224.61
Montana – $227.20
Rhode Island – $227.70
Idaho – $240.82
Massachusetts – $243.72
South Dakota – $250.16

We used the same calculation to find the states saving the most to find the states saving the least. While states in Midwest and South are saving the most, it’s the coastal and sparsely populated states that are seeing the fewest savings. Sorry Hawaii and Alaska. And as you can see below, it’s the sparsely populated states with the smallest drop in gas prices.

States with Smallest Drop in Gas Prices

Hawaii – 8%
Wyoming – 10%
Montana – 11%
Alaska – 12%
Utah – 12%
North Dakota – 13%
Idaho – 13%
South Dakota – 13%
Vermont – 14%
Nebraska –  14%

So what does this all mean? Move to the South. Roll Tide. The Midwest is an option, too. Go Hoosiers.

Other articles you might like:

What states can you survive in without a car?

Most reliable car brands

Best and worst times to buy a car

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Written by Max Katsarelas & Turner Parlin
Infographic by Sam Jackson
Photo credits:,

Are you SCARED of your car? You should be.

Driving a car is an extremely dangerous activity that most people do everyday. It doesn’t faze us that we share the roads with drowsy, distracted and drunk drivers, each wielding their very own 2-ton death-machines, loaded with gallons of liquid explosives. Unfortunately, there are other threats on the horizon. As more automotive systems become controlled by computers, your car is increasingly more vulnerable to hacker attacks.

what can be hacked in a car infographic

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The infographic above shows the systems that can be hacked on any new car and many used cars on the market. The more robust and interconnected the computer system is, the more that can be done to your car.

Of course, not every hacker is a psychopath with homicidal intentions. It is unlikely, but not impossible, that a hacker would go through the extreme effort to harm the average Toyota Prius owner. A hack-attack could even be harmless, albeit very annoying. Below we break down every hack by degree of severity. [keep reading]

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