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Auto Insurance Minimums by State

old timey car crash mojo motors blog

We have been crashing cars as long as we have been building them. And we’ve made a lot more progress with the building than we have with the crashing. State car insurance minimums are in the news right now because Arizona is considering a bill to increase the required insurance minimums in their state. This is important because when the amount of damage in an accident exceeds what’s covered under the insurance policy the driver is often liable and it can result in catastrophic financial damage and often bankruptcy. [keep reading]

Paul’s automotive predictions for 2015

With automakers finally regaining pre-recession vitality, 2015 is shaping up to be an exciting year in the industry. As tech and auto amalgamate, automakers are forming partnerships with technology companies and vice versa.

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Recently the Mojo marketing team sat down with Paul Nadjarian, our founder and CEO, to discuss what’s in store for our industry this year. We put together a list of the thirteen trends that Paul believes will dictate the automotive storylines of 2015. [keep reading]

General Motors 2014 Recalls Infographic

Updated August 13, 2014
Updated July 24, 2014
Updated June 30, 2014

In the first half of 2014, General Motors recalled more cars than it sold in the last five years according to this article. Between the lawsuits, hearings at Capital Hill, internal investigations, delivering new parts to dealers, getting drivers to bring in their recalled cars – this is the general state of General Motors.

Logo of GM Recalls Cobalt

The automaker, already fined a maximum of $35 million, is looking at an even larger settlement expected to be in the billions. Just last month in May of 2014, Toyota agreed to pay $1.2 billion for misleading consumers and the government on their own recalls. [keep reading]

Uber’s toughest year yet

There are many ride sharing services that provide an alternative to traditional taxi cabs, but none larger than Uber. With backing from big names like Google Ventures, Goldman Sachs and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Uber has expanded globally and asserted its dominance in cities across the United States. They’re now worth an estimated $40 billion and still growing. But monumental growth does not come without growing pains.

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The same aggressive business and marketing strategies that made Uber a success have also got them into trouble several times this year. From shady business tactics, to neglecting passenger safety, to privacy issues, Uber has gotten almost as much bad publicity in 2014 as General Motors, the undisputed recall champ.

That’s why we’ve put together this infographic that shows the company’s public relations missteps throughout 2014. [keep reading]

States saving the most money on gas

Oil prices are falling sharply and lower oil prices leads to lower gas prices. Before you buy that SUV you always wanted, you might want to find out how much you can really save. We already told you about states with the highest gas tax, but now we figured out what states are benefiting the most from the recent drop in gas prices. To find this out, we looked at a few metrics like miles driven per year and gas prices based on the 2014 high and low as of October 2014.

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The data around gas prices came from the website GasBuddy.com, a terrific resource for looking at gas prices by state or city. They also have a cool app that helps you find the cheapest gas near you. The breakdown of the average miles driven by state came from a study conducted by US Public Interest Research Groups.

Top 10 States Saving the Most

Indiana – $515.21
Alabama – $507.53
Ohio – $504.40
Mississippi – $449.37
Kentucky – $441.10
Georgia – $425.98
Michigan – $420.70
Tennessee – $415.44
Missouri – $407.98
Delaware – $393.10

We determined these states are saving the most by dividing average miles driven per year by the average miles per gallon and then multiplying by the decrease in price. Simple, right? We assumed the average miles per gallon was 20. The less fuel efficient your car is, the more you will save. Let’s say you live in Indiana and drive an old Suburban, you could save over $700 if gas prices stay flat. If they fall more, you save more.

So why are these states saving the most? Well, it’s a few of different reasons. Either these states have a high gas tax, their drivers put more miles on their cars each year than other drivers in other states or the price of gas just dropped more. Take Michigan or Indiana, for example, with a gas tax above 40 cents per gallon of gas. As gas prices go down, so does the amount a state is pulling in on taxes. States like Alabama or Missouri have some of the most well-traveled citizens, logging over 11,000 miles behind the wheel each year.

Now let’s pause for Kanye to make it rain.

States with Biggest Drop in Gas Prices

Ohio – 26%
Indiana – 22%
Michigan – 22%
Delaware – 21%
Tennessee – 21%
South Carolina – 21%
Kentucky – 21%
Alabama – 21%
Georgia – 21%
Illinois – 21%
California – 21%

Just because these states have the biggest drop in gas prices, doesn’t mean drivers are actually saving the most. In California where gas prices are among the highest in the country, a 21% drop still might not be a relief for drivers. On the flip side, in South Carolina where gas prices are the lowest in the nation, that extra 21% probably makes gas seem practically free.

Now that you know the states saving the most and which have seen gas prices drop more than anywhere else, let’s look at the losers.

Gas Station Prices Are Too High

Top 10 States Saving the Least

Hawaii – $127.77
Alaska – $156.02
New York – $176.19
Utah – $203.85
District of Columbia – $224.61
Montana – $227.20
Rhode Island – $227.70
Idaho – $240.82
Massachusetts – $243.72
South Dakota – $250.16

We used the same calculation to find the states saving the most to find the states saving the least. While states in Midwest and South are saving the most, it’s the coastal and sparsely populated states that are seeing the fewest savings. Sorry Hawaii and Alaska. And as you can see below, it’s the sparsely populated states with the smallest drop in gas prices.

States with Smallest Drop in Gas Prices

Hawaii – 8%
Wyoming – 10%
Montana – 11%
Alaska – 12%
Utah – 12%
North Dakota – 13%
Idaho – 13%
South Dakota – 13%
Vermont – 14%
Nebraska –  14%

So what does this all mean? Move to the South. Roll Tide. The Midwest is an option, too. Go Hoosiers.

Other articles you might like:

What states can you survive in without a car?

Most reliable car brands

Best and worst times to buy a car

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Written by Max Katsarelas & Turner Parlin
Infographic by Sam Jackson
Photo credits: Automotive.com,

Will driverless cars ever look normal?

In a Mojo Motors poll, 4 out of 5 people said they would not buy an autonomous car if it were on the market today. Even early adopters might be wary of buying a driverless car. It’s tough looking past the unusual design language and that big do-hicky on the roof that looks like a rotor-less helicopter motor.

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To be fair, Google’s prototype would be blind without that chunky Lidar detector on the roof. In its current form, Lidar (Light Detection And Ranging) may be unsightly, but the technology is critical to autonomous cars. It provides a detailed 3D map of the vehicle’s surroundings in real time. This data is run through algorithms that allow the vehicle to identify and react to minute signals such as when a biker signals a lefthand turn. [keep reading]

How much is my state gas tax?

gas-pumps

The smartest college students in Boston know that on the way back from a ski trip, you’ve got to stop at the liquor store to pick up supplies before you cross the border back into Massachusetts. That’s because New Hampshire has no alcohol tax, whereas Massachusetts takes $4.05 per gallon in taxes from the sale of the standard volume spirits with 40% alcohol.

It turns out that the same discrepancies exist for fuel taxes. In addition to the federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon (CPG) for gasoline, each state issues unique taxes and fees which are compounded with federal rate.

These additional costs vary significantly across state lines. On the low end, Alaska collects 12.4 CPG for gasoline on top of the federal tax. On the high end, New York collects 50.5 CPG.

state-gas-tax-infographic-2014-mojo-motors

In this study, we’ve taken the federal tax out of the equation in order to analyze patterns and differences in state fuel taxes. Like so many “cost of living” heat maps, the discrepancy between the coasts and the interior of the US is striking. The four most expensive states to live in, according to CNBC, are New York, California, Connecticut and Hawaii. These are also the four states with the highest taxes on gasoline. Fun fact: the fifth most expensive state to live in, Alaska, has the cheapest gasoline taxes. Drill baby, drill! [keep reading]

Hey America, Formula E is no joke

The newest edition to the racing world has debuted with a bang. On Saturday, drivers took to the course in the inaugural FIA Formula E Round 1 in Beijing, fighting for a place in the history books as the first driver ever to win a Formula E race.

heidfeld-prost-formula-e-2014-beijing-crash

In lap 25 of 25, it came down to Nick Heidfeld of Germany who drives for Leonardo DiCaprio’s race team and Nicolas Prost of France. Heidefeld made his move, accelerating to the outside. The two cars collided, resulting in a spectacular crash that ended with Heidfeld upside down, uninjured but shaken. Brazillian driver, Lucas Degrassi, ended up taking the win for Audi Sport.

At 150mph, Formula E cars only reach speeds two thirds as fast as their Formula One brethren, yet the new electric vehicles offer their own excitement. Apart from the technological feats required to master the nascent technology of electric racers, this crash demonstrated the dynamic acceleration capabilities of these vehicles.

Formula E might be the only motorsport that is quiet enough to allow music to be played throughout the race, but clearly it is no joke. It is also clear that some Formula E drivers are not yet acclimated to the capabilities of their new vehicles. Heidfeld’s last minute decision to attempt an overtake took Prost by surprise and he has publicly apologized to his friend via Twitter, “I understand that I am responsible. I just did not see him, feel very bad.”

nick-heidfeld-nicolas-prost

The winner of the inaugural race, Lucas Degrassi, is likely the driver who is most comfortable being powered by a battery. He was the FIA’s first official test driver during the development of the Formula E Series. If this first race has shown us anything, it is that we can expect even more excitement as drivers gain more experience and EV technology continues to evolve.

Given the waning popularity of open wheel racing in the US, it is no surprise that there isn’t much buzz around Formula E. Tesla has succeeded in proving to Americans that EVs can be sexy, but the company is not even allowed to sell directly to consumers in most states, and we’re all still waiting for that “affordable” Tesla Model 3 that Elon promised us.

We’ve got a long way to go before Formula E takes over our weekends, but maybe that will change once Tesla enters a car in the race, or once we’ve had it it with the National Football League. If you’re interested, the next installment of the ten-race inaugural season will broadcast from Malaysia on November 22.


Written by Sam Jackson

Images: Speede-Formel.de

Asphalt Battles: Cars VS Bikes

The war between cyclists and cars rages on as the “Green Revolution” continues putting more and more bikes on the road. Big cities are used to absent-minded cyclists and delivery boys nearly taking out cross walkers and scratching the sides of cars. Bike sharing compounds the problem, giving novice pedal pushers easy access to a 3-speed so they can run red lights and ride in the opposite direction on one-way streets.

bike-on-road Cyclists don’t deserve all the blame. What about jaywalking pedestrians and drivers that don’t check their blind spot before turning? No one is innocent. The truth is, there is space on the road for everyone, but if no one wants to follow the rules of the road, paths are bound to cross. [keep reading]

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