Press

Autonomous car proliferation predictions proffered (Technology Tell)

technology tell logoArticle by Brett Solomon for Technology Tell

Sorry, it is not that our Creskin powers are weak — they are non-existent when it comes to the arrival of the first autonomous cars. Why? I predict that an auto manufacturer out of left field will be the first out of the gate. Or Google will. In any event, check out this cool chart from MojoMotors.com that shows manufacturer predictions. [keep reading]

Diesel Facts to Dealership Hacks (Gawker Media)

Article by Andy Jenson for Gawker Media

Car shopping can be about as fun as chasing down electrical problems on a fifty-year-old British sports car. Between dealership runaround, price volatility, and variables from site to site, buying a vehicle can take hours of work and a ton of cross-shopping. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Enter Paul Nadjarian. [keep reading]

Anti-Tesla Legislation Battleground (Motrolix)

motrolix_logo_v1Article by Aaron Brzozowski for Motrolix

Look at the above map, where red colors those states in the US which have passed “anti-Tesla legislation” banning the company from direct consumer sales, and you’ll notice one thing: the electric automaker has lost a lot of ground. This map was brought to our attention by the folks at Green Car Reports (originally from Mojo Motors), and has been updated as of November 4th. [keep reading]

5 High-Tech Luxury Car Features That May Reach All Cars (CheapCarInsurance.net)

cheap car ins logoArticle by Aaron Crowe for CheapCarInsurance.net

Luxury cars are often used by automakers to test new features in the marketplace, and since the cars already come at a high price, adding new high-tech equipment that’s sold as an option package gives them a way to test it more in real life. “In 2018, backup cameras will be mandatory in all vehicles sold in the U.S. A few years back, that technology was only available as an additional option in luxury cars,” says Paul Nadjarian, CEO of Mojo Motors, an online automotive marketplace that tracks used car prices at dealerships. [keep reading]

See which states allow direct sales of Tesla cars (mLIVE)

mlive logoArticle by David Muller for mLIVE

Gov. Rick Snyder recently signed legislation that Tesla Motors and others see as extremely restrictive for the California electric car maker to do business in the state. Snyder noted as he signed HB 5606 into law that Tesla’s unique, non-dealership, direct-to-consumer sales structure was already illegal in Michigan before the legislation cruised through Lansing. [keep reading]

The Most Durable Automobiles on U.S. Roads (Wall St. Cheat Sheet)

WSCS Blog LogoArticle by Justin Lloyd-Miller for Wall St. Cheat Sheet

Automotive shopping and research resource Mojo Motors recently conducted a study to seek out what cars still made good buys with the highest mileage in their respective classes.

“We analyzed almost 300,000 vehicles on Mojo Motors from the model years 2002 to 2012 to find the highest mileage used vehicles,” the site said. [keep reading]

About gas taxes (boston.com)

boston-dot-com-logoArticle by Bill Griffith for boston.com

Snowbirds and parents driving college students along the East Coast on a regular basis quickly realize that gas prices are lower in New Jersey, Virginia, and South Carolina. Conversely, it’s best to avoid filling up in Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina. The reason? State taxes on gasoline vary considerably around the country. A tip of the cap goes to Sam Jackson and New York-based car-shopping website MojoMotors.com for compiling the countrywide data. One of the reasons for doing the study, notes Jackson, is the pending global warming tax that California is scheduled to implement on January 1, adding a predicted 15 cents per gallon. [keep reading]

Here’s How Gasoline Taxes Stack Up State By State (Wall St. Cheat Sheet)

WSCS Blog LogoArticle by Justin Lloyd-Miller for Wall St. Cheat Sheet

For many states, taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel are an important source of revenue for supporting road and infrastructure programs. Most road work and bridge repair is largely funded by money raised from taxes on gasoline, both at the federal and state level. The federal government imposes a tax that amounts to about $0.18 per gallon. The money raised through this specific tax is used to finance major repairs to interstate highways and bridges, as well as roads through national parks and other public infrastructure. Recently, the issues surrounding the desperate state of the nation’s road and bridge network have led many to believe that a tax hike might be in order to address the crumbling roads, freeways, and bridges unless another solution is proposed. [keep reading]

« Older Entries