Shopper Resources

Best cars for city driving

City life is tough for cars as well as their drivers. Cars have to deal with potholes, traffic jams and crazy cab drivers. Drivers have to deal with confusing signs, parking tickets and -hah- crazy cab drivers. That’s why many people choose to live where they can get by without a car altogether. And that’s why many people are looking forward to the day when you will be able to buy a driverless car.
multi level car storage nyc

Nonetheless, having a car in the city makes getting around town easier and allows you to escape the concrete jungle on the weekends. The ideal urban vehicle is easy to park, durable and still has room for trips to Ikea. Whether you’re zipping around The Mission of San Francisco or braving the streets of Brooklyn, these cars will make city life a little bit easier. [keep reading]

Gifts for every kind of car person

Car enthusiasts are a tough bunch, especially when it comes to buying them gifts for the holidays. And since you’ve resorted to the wisdom of the internet, we’re assuming you need some help. Give one of these gifts and you’ll make the car lover in your life as excited as this kid unwrapping Star Wars Legos.

We’ve put together a list that covers everyone from the racer to the mechanic to the commuter. [keep reading]

The real reason gas is cheaper in the winter

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Much of the country has been enjoying low gas prices lately, some states more than others. There are several factors contributing to this year’s dip, but gas prices are typically lower during the winter. If you ask your know-it-all uncle, he will probably tell you that gas prices drop when it gets cold because people are driving less, thus decreasing the demand for gasoline. To a certain extent, he’s right. People do most of their road trips during the spring and summer months. But that’s not the real reason gas is cheaper in the winter. [keep reading]

Become a car-shopping expert in 2 minutes

Finding the right car is complicated. Do you want to buy new or used? What’s your budget? Do you need an extra large cup holder for your venti latte? And that’s just the beginning. Once you get to the dealership, you’ve got to inspect the vehicle, wade through financing options and finally negotiate the deal.

Our Founder and CEO, Paul Nadjarian, has some advice for you. He might live in Harlem and drive a Honda Odyssey, but he is a true car guy who grew up racing souped on station wagons on Woodward Ave. He’s worked in the automotive industry for over 20 years, serving as an executive at Ford and eBay Motors before starting Mojo.

Recently, Paul got together with the folks at State Farm and Gawker Media to develop the ultimate car-buying guide. If you’re shopping for a car, this video will prove about as useful as a swiss army knife. Still have questions? Leave a comment and Paul will get back to you with an answer.

Need more tips? Maybe these will help:

Buy the used BMW, not the new Honda

Best AWD used cars for winter under $10,000

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Written by Sam Jackson

You’re putting the wrong gas in your car

If you make the mistake of pumping diesel fuel into a gas engine, or vice versa, you’ll know pretty quickly. On the other hand, if you fill up with the wrong octane fuel you might not notice the difference. Putting the wrong octane fuel in your car won’t necessarily result in catastrophic failure, but it could have damaging long-term effects and lead to costly repairs.

the right gas to put in your car

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The handy infographic above shows the recommended fuel type for models 2012 and newer. We hope this clears up any confusion you might have so you don’t end up paying the price for your ignorance. If your car isn’t listed here, refer to your owner’s manual or the inside of your gas cap for the recommended octane.  [keep reading]

How much is my state gas tax?

gas-pumps

The smartest college students in Boston know that on the way back from a ski trip, you’ve got to stop at the liquor store to pick up supplies before you cross the border back into Massachusetts. That’s because New Hampshire has no alcohol tax, whereas Massachusetts takes $4.05 per gallon in taxes from the sale of the standard volume spirits with 40% alcohol.

It turns out that the same discrepancies exist for fuel taxes. In addition to the federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon (CPG) for gasoline, each state issues unique taxes and fees which are compounded with federal rate.

These additional costs vary significantly across state lines. On the low end, Alaska collects 12.4 CPG for gasoline on top of the federal tax. On the high end, New York collects 50.5 CPG.

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In this study, we’ve taken the federal tax out of the equation in order to analyze patterns and differences in state fuel taxes. Like so many “cost of living” heat maps, the discrepancy between the coasts and the interior of the US is striking. The four most expensive states to live in, according to CNBC, are New York, California, Connecticut and Hawaii. These are also the four states with the highest taxes on gasoline. Fun fact: the fifth most expensive state to live in, Alaska, has the cheapest gasoline taxes. Drill baby, drill! [keep reading]

10 best cars for doing the nasty

Car sex isn’t just for teenagers with no lock on their bedroom door. When you can’t get privacy at home, don’t have money for a motel room or simply can’t wait until you get home to bone, your car may be the only option. Everyone has done the dirty in their car at some point or another. Right?

Toyota Car is Rocking

It can be exciting, but it can also be a bit challenging depending on your vehicle. Since we love providing shoppers with invaluable car buying advice, we put together a list of the 10 best cars to do it in. So turn off the motor, set the radio low, hop in the back seat and get to it. [keep reading]

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Shoppers care more about bulletproofed trucks than recalls

A few months back we studied over 35,000 emails to dealerships on Mojo Motors from shoppers interesting in buying a car. What we found was shoppers don’t care about recalls. Only two people asked about them. That’s right, only .005 percent of people asked about recalls. Since that article was published, there have been something like a billion more vehicle recalls and that’s not counting those GM recalls.

truck-with-bullet-holesShoppers now must really be wary of open recalls on used cars. They aren’t. In a study of nearly 20,000 new email leads to dealers since May, not a single person mentioned the word recall. Most people don’t even ask questions as the majority of people (81 percent) use the stock email message. Here’s what everyone else (19 percent) wanted to know. [keep reading]

How much are you paying per mile in an EV?

You turn on the television and breaking news is on every channel. It has finally happened. The zombie apocalypse. You gaze out your window and see hoards of stumbling, bloody, post-human creatures thirsty for human flesh. A government official advises the remaining population to flee to the safety of a heavily guarded military base 100 miles away. You grab what you can and jump into your electric car, only to realize it has a range of 81 miles and can’t make the trip.

walking-dead-zombies-images

It seems outlandish,  but this is exactly the type of scenario that inhibits people from purchasing electric vehicles. In actuality, the average miles driven per day in the United States is well under 50 miles, yet range anxiety permeates society. Of course, that is not the only impeding factor in the sales of EVs. Even with the sizable tax credits, the technology comes at a premium. [keep reading]

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