Shopper Resources

You’re putting the wrong gas in your car

If you make the mistake of pumping diesel fuel into a gas engine, or vice versa, you’ll know pretty quickly. On the other hand, if you fill up with the wrong octane fuel you might not notice the difference. Putting the wrong octane fuel in your car won’t necessarily result in catastrophic failure, but it could have damaging long-term effects and lead to costly repairs.

the right gas to put in your car

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The handy infographic above shows the recommended fuel type for models 2012 and newer. We hope this clears up any confusion you might have so you don’t end up paying the price for your ignorance. If your car isn’t listed here, refer to your owner’s manual or the inside of your gas cap for the recommended octane.  [keep reading]

How much is my state gas tax?

gas-pumps

The smartest college students in Boston know that on the way back from a ski trip, you’ve got to stop at the liquor store to pick up supplies before you cross the border back into Massachusetts. That’s because New Hampshire has no alcohol tax, whereas Massachusetts takes $4.05 per gallon in taxes from the sale of the standard volume spirits with 40% alcohol.

It turns out that the same discrepancies exist for fuel taxes. In addition to the federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon (CPG) for gasoline, each state issues unique taxes and fees which are compounded with federal rate.

These additional costs vary significantly across state lines. On the low end, Alaska collects 12.4 CPG for gasoline on top of the federal tax. On the high end, New York collects 50.5 CPG.

state-gas-tax-infographic-2014-mojo-motors

In this study, we’ve taken the federal tax out of the equation in order to analyze patterns and differences in state fuel taxes. Like so many “cost of living” heat maps, the discrepancy between the coasts and the interior of the US is striking. The four most expensive states to live in, according to CNBC, are New York, California, Connecticut and Hawaii. These are also the four states with the highest taxes on gasoline. Fun fact: the fifth most expensive state to live in, Alaska, has the cheapest gasoline taxes. Drill baby, drill! [keep reading]

10 best cars for doing the nasty

Car sex isn’t just for teenagers with no lock on their bedroom door. When you can’t get privacy at home, don’t have money for a motel room or simply can’t wait until you get home to bone, your car may be the only option. Everyone has done the dirty in their car at some point or another. Right?

Toyota Car is Rocking

It can be exciting, but it can also be a bit challenging depending on your vehicle. Since we love providing shoppers with invaluable car buying advice, we put together a list of the 10 best cars to do it in. So turn off the motor, set the radio low, hop in the back seat and get to it. [keep reading]

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Shoppers care more about bulletproofed trucks than recalls

A few months back we studied over 35,000 emails to dealerships on Mojo Motors from shoppers interesting in buying a car. What we found was shoppers don’t care about recalls. Only two people asked about them. That’s right, only .005 percent of people asked about recalls. Since that article was published, there have been something like a billion more vehicle recalls and that’s not counting those GM recalls.

truck-with-bullet-holesShoppers now must really be wary of open recalls on used cars. They aren’t. In a study of nearly 20,000 new email leads to dealers since May, not a single person mentioned the word recall. Most people don’t even ask questions as the majority of people (81 percent) use the stock email message. Here’s what everyone else (19 percent) wanted to know. [keep reading]

How much are you paying per mile in an EV?

You turn on the television and breaking news is on every channel. It has finally happened. The zombie apocalypse. You gaze out your window and see hoards of stumbling, bloody, post-human creatures thirsty for human flesh. A government official advises the remaining population to flee to the safety of a heavily guarded military base 100 miles away. You grab what you can and jump into your electric car, only to realize it has a range of 81 miles and can’t make the trip.

walking-dead-zombies-images

It seems outlandish,  but this is exactly the type of scenario that inhibits people from purchasing electric vehicles. In actuality, the average miles driven per day in the United States is well under 50 miles, yet range anxiety permeates society. Of course, that is not the only impeding factor in the sales of EVs. Even with the sizable tax credits, the technology comes at a premium. [keep reading]

Every car name categorized

Have you ever wondered what the name of your car means or maybe how manufacturers come up with names? After all, we say names like Camry, Miata and Passat without pausing to think if those names have a meaning. Turns out almost every car name has some significance that can be grouped into 12 categories.

what does the name of your car mean

Our study looked at 215 models, but there were exclusions. We left out some discontinued models and models with letter-number naming conventions used by BMW, Lexus and Mercedes. [keep reading]

Is buying a diesel worth it?

We recently published a study to find if buying a hybrid car is worth it and the price per mile on an EV. While the initial price of the hybrid trim is more expensive than a non-hybrid, the savings with superior fuel economy pays off in the long run, right? The results were surprising and it got us thinking if diesel cars are really worth the extra coin.

Diesel Versus Non Diesel

We conducted this study in a similar fashion to the hybrid study. We found models available with both diesel and traditional unleaded gasoline engines, equipped them comparably and then found the difference in MSRP. We calculated how many miles someone would have to drive a diesel car for the savings in fuel consumption to outweigh the increased price. The only real difference between the two studies is accounting for the cost of diesel fuel. [keep reading]

Is your crossover more car or more SUV?

Crossovers combine the comfort and drive-ability of a sedan with the utility of an SUV. Since crossovers are one of the most Followed type of vehicle on Mojo Motors, we set out to find if a crossover is more car-like or more SUV-like. We studied 15 crossovers and their specs including engine size, horsepower, MPG, towing capacity, payload capacity and ground clearance. See exactly where your crossover falls below.

Make sure to click on the infographic below for the full-size view.
Is your car more suv or car

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The “most car-like” crossovers are at the top with the city backdrop and the “most SUV-like” crossovers at the bottom in front of the mountain. During the analysis we had to define what makes a car and what makes an SUV. Keep reading to find out why we determined a CR-V is more like a Civic than a Suburban. [keep reading]

What states can you survive in without a car?

We wanted to see where ridesharing services were operating to determine where it is possible to survive without a car in the United States.  In our evaluation, we looked at five of the most pervasive services: Uber, Lyft, SideCar, RelayRides, and ZipCar. Then we plotted the services on a map which you can see below. If you’d like to learn more about these services and other ridesharing companies currently operating in the US, check out the ultimate guide to ridesharing companies we put together.

ridesharing infographic 2014-08-13

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It is expensive to own a vehicle. The price to buy one, the cost to repair, insurance premiums, parking and gas…it all adds up quick. Until recently, most Americans had no choice but to accept these costs as unavoidable. But now, a significant percentage of the population is adopting new forms of transportation. In many parts of the country, especially in big cities, ridesharing services have made it easy to get around without owning a vehicle. [keep reading]

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