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How much is my state gas tax?

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The smartest college students in Boston know that on the way back from a ski trip, you’ve got to stop at the liquor store to pick up supplies before you cross the border back into Massachusetts. That’s because New Hampshire has no alcohol tax, whereas Massachusetts takes $4.05 per gallon in taxes from the sale of the standard volume spirits with 40% alcohol.

It turns out that the same discrepancies exist for fuel taxes. In addition to the federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon (CPG) for gasoline, each state issues unique taxes and fees which are compounded with federal rate.

These additional costs vary significantly across state lines. On the low end, Alaska collects 12.4 CPG for gasoline on top of the federal tax. On the high end, New York collects 50.5 CPG.

state-gas-tax-infographic-2014-mojo-motors

In this study, we’ve taken the federal tax out of the equation in order to analyze patterns and differences in state fuel taxes. Like so many “cost of living” heat maps, the discrepancy between the coasts and the interior of the US is striking. The four most expensive states to live in, according to CNBC, are New York, California, Connecticut and Hawaii. These are also the four states with the highest taxes on gasoline. Fun fact: the fifth most expensive state to live in, Alaska, has the cheapest gasoline taxes. Drill baby, drill! [keep reading]

Is your crossover more car or more SUV?

Crossovers combine the comfort and drive-ability of a sedan with the utility of an SUV. Since crossovers are one of the most Followed type of vehicle on Mojo Motors, we set out to find if a crossover is more car-like or more SUV-like. We studied 15 crossovers and their specs including engine size, horsepower, MPG, towing capacity, payload capacity and ground clearance. See exactly where your crossover falls below.

Make sure to click on the infographic below for the full-size view.
Is your car more suv or car

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The “most car-like” crossovers are at the top with the city backdrop and the “most SUV-like” crossovers at the bottom in front of the mountain. During the analysis we had to define what makes a car and what makes an SUV. Keep reading to find out why we determined a CR-V is more like a Civic than a Suburban. [keep reading]

What states can you survive in without a car?

We wanted to see where ridesharing services were operating to determine where it is possible to survive without a car in the United States.  In our evaluation, we looked at five of the most pervasive services: Uber, Lyft, SideCar, RelayRides, and ZipCar. Then we plotted the services on a map which you can see below. If you’d like to learn more about these services and other ridesharing companies currently operating in the US, check out the ultimate guide to ridesharing companies we put together.

ridesharing infographic 2014-08-13

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It is expensive to own a vehicle. The price to buy one, the cost to repair, insurance premiums, parking and gas…it all adds up quick. Until recently, most Americans had no choice but to accept these costs as unavoidable. But now, a significant percentage of the population is adopting new forms of transportation. In many parts of the country, especially in big cities, ridesharing services have made it easy to get around without owning a vehicle. [keep reading]

Driverless cars: legal in some states, not in others (boston.com)

boston-dot-com-logoArticle by Kevin Hartnett for boston.com

Driverless cars are coming, though they’re on course to arrive in some states sooner than others. The used car website Mojo Motors recently created an infographic that shows the status of driverless car legislation in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. California, Nevada, Florida, Michigan, and D.C., have all passed laws explicitly authorizing companies to test driverless cars on private and public roads within their borders (in large part to try and attract driverless technology companies). [keep reading]

The Sheer Scale Of General Motors’ 2014 Recall Mess In One Infographic (Car Throttle)

car-throttle-logo-smallArticle by Matt Robinson for Car Throttle

General Motors has been appearing in the news frequently this year due to recalls. A faulty ignition switch in certain GM products was recently linked to 13 deaths, and the resulting recall could lead to the automotive giant switching solely to push-button starters. As we’re able to see from this infographic, that problem is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to GM’s recall woes. [keep reading]

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