Minivan

What car shoppers search for is misleading

Auto Remarketing wrote a similar article based on our data. You can read that here.

The discrepancy between what people search online and what they actually end up purchasing can, often times, be entirely different. It sort of makes sense – people are aspirational. It’s the whole reason you see young and beautiful models in advertisements, not the middle aged and overweight. For real, who wouldn’t rather have a BMW over a Kia?

Take the minivan, for example. Most people don’t want the minivan. They will do anything they possibly can to get an Acadia, a Pilot or anything that can fit 8 people, tow a boat and not cost more than half of their median income. In most cases, practicality prevails and people end up with that affordable Grand Caravan and their dreams dwindle away in the internet history folder.

This is not always true, however, it really just depends on the vehicle they’re searching. For example, the numbers and Google Analytics and SQL man at Mojo Motors, Michael Milstein pulled up some data nuggets on the cars members search for most and the cars they actually bought. Make the jump for some surprises. [keep reading]

Why minivans will make a comeback

Automotive News reported recently that the Wuling minivan in China is selling like bingzis or whatever the Chinese call hotcakes. Translation: this means they’re selling really darn good. Whilst Americans continue to buy up big trucks, SUV’s and crossovers, don’t be surprised if there’s a renaissance of the minivan. But wait, then why would Dodge drop the Grand Caravan or why would Ford stop building minivans in America altogether? To focus on crossovers where there might be more money to be made.

This might be a premature shift in strategy because there’s still a market for the minivan. Sure, the number of people buying minivans has dropped from about 1.3 million in 2000 to 540,000 in 2011, but so far in 2012, AutoData reports 10.6% growth. Two months the L.A. Times reported that fuel efficiency is what car buyers care about most after a Consumer Reports found 37% of shoppers care about fuel economy. Quality of the car, which should probably be more important came in second at a measly 17%. Gas mileage alone is reason enough why minivans should make a comeback, but keep reading for more. [keep reading]

Putting it into park: Weekend Linkage

The whole Joe Paterno thing has been a bit distracting and dominated the airwaves the past few days. No worries because we’ve got you covered on what happened in the world of cars from the week that was November 7th through the 11th. Links for some of the biggest car stories are below this hideous picture.

Peace Out Honda Element Image Mojo Motors

Yahoo! Autos lists 14 vehicles that will meet their end in 2012 and some won’t be missed

The Chevrolet Captiva will confuse American car buyers

This lady will change your opinion of Toyota Prius drivers

Is the Nissan Quest going to takeover the minivan segment?

Traffic exhaust not only smells bad but it will make you dumber

A picture of Cadillac’s newest flagship, the XTS, is floating around the web


Photo credits: CNN Money

Mojo Motors used car search infographics

Most and Least Searched Automakers on Mojo Motors ImageUsed cars and trucks are sort of our thing, actually check that, used cars and trucks are our thing. We have vehicles listings in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island, so basically Mojo Motors is pushing lots and lots of used rides in New England. As Mojo Motors continues to expand into new reaches of the United States, we continue to uncover interesting information on used car buyers. More specifically, what used car shoppers are searching for on the Mojo Motors website.

September’s numbers have been crunched, the paper’s been pushed and with some mathematical skills we’ve determined the most popular used cars and trucks in New England. We’ve also found the most popular automakers as well as the most unpopular automaker and model searches too. The results may be surprising. Make the jump to see the results and poorly made infographics.

[keep reading]