used cars

What do NASCAR pros use as their daily drivers?

This may come as a bit of a surprise to some, but NASCAR Sprint Cup vehicles are not legal street-driven vehicles. In fact, NASCAR race cars are a lot different than the one you drive. So despite what you see in commercials, they are not the daily drivers of your favorite oval track hero. NASCAR success and fame comes with a nice payday, and the drivers can afford pretty much any vehicle made, which explains the wide variety found on this list of their rides of choice.

Dale Earnhardt Jr.

Djr-16-9-camaro

The Earnhardt family has been in Chevy dealerships for generations, and Jr has a particular affinity for the Camaro. A fourth generation Camaro could be bought with dealer modifications to become an “Intimidator SS”, and this process was repeated in 2011 with a fifth generation Camaro SS making 704 hp. Intimidator indeed. While Jr sells these at his dealership, he’d rather drive the older ones. He owns a silver 1967 Camaro rebuilt by Detroit Speed Inc., featuring a traditional small block Chevy v8 with aluminum heads and a carburetor running power to a five-speed stick. A different flavor is available with his orange 1972 Camaro. This one has a modern six-speed and LS2 v8, but the EFI has been ripped out in favor of a carb. Oddities of his collection include a 1977 Oldsmobile Cutlass, and a Pontiac G8 converted to look like a Holden Commodore. [keep reading]

Used Electric Vehicles are Finally Here

Tesla is facing the best kind of problem an automaker can have —they can’t produce enough cars to meet the demand. That’s especially impressive when you consider the Model S starts at over $70,000.  Other manufacturers aren’t quite as lucky as Tesla, but overall the market for EVs (Electric Vehicles) and PHEVs (Plug-In Hybrids) is growing at a steady clip. The world is getter greener, and we’re not referring to these green cars. These days, Nissan Leafs and charging stations are a normal sight in parking garages and driveways around the US. With 126,000 all-electric vehicles and 142,000 plug-in hybrids sold in the US between 2010 and 2014, a market for used electric vehicles has finally emerged.

Used-Electric-Vehicle-Sales-2-16-15

At over 70,000 cars sold, the Nissan Leaf is leading the charge (no pun intended). The Leaf also stands out as the only EV to sell over 10,000 units in its first year of availability. Most EV models have only been available for a year or two, although a small batch of Toyota Rav4 EVs was rolled out in the early 2000’s.

While depreciation hurts the original buyer, it helps those looking to buy used. More than 70,000 of the EVs sold are 2 years old or more, and many can be found for half the MSRP of a new model. We explored MojoMotors.com to see what the options are for those looking to buy used EVs.

Screen Shot 2015-02-06 at 1.17.03 PM

We expected to find dozens of Nissan Leafs for sale, but we weren’t expecting the prices to be so low. For under $15,000, you can step into a Nissan Leaf with under 30,000 miles. A comparable Mitsubishi i-MIEV could be had for even less. The Nissan Leaf also faired well in our electric vehicle cost per mile comparison, making it an excellent value. Since Nissan guarantees the battery to last 8 years/100,000 miles, any Leaf for sale should still have many miles to travel before diminished range becomes an issue.

Find a used Nissan Leaf

BMW i3 usedIf you’re seeking something more luxurious and unique than the Leaf, ze Germans have what you are looking for. BMW began selling the i3 just last year, but there’s already several for sale on the used market. The BMW i3 has a range comparable to the Leaf, but has a more upscale feel and much more appealing interior, especially for those who respect wood. The exterior styling is admittedly love-it or hate-it, but it certainly has more flair than other EVs. With only 14 used i3s available on Mojo (and most of those in California) you better be prepared to travel to pick one up.

Find a used BMW i3
used gen 1 rev4 ev

Here is something we weren’t expecting to find at all —an original, 1st generation Toyota Rav4 EV. The EPA rated its driving range at an impressive 97 miles on a single charge, although that number has surely dwindled over the many years. Toyota produced 1,400 from 1997 to 2003 and its estimated that 500 are still on the road today. As of the publish date, this beauty is still available. You can see the listing here.

The second generation Rav4 EV was developed in collaboration with Tesla but unfortunately didn’t inherit Tesla-level range, instead maxing out at 103 miles per charge. But it does have 154hp, which dwarfs the 64hp from the original Rav4 EV. It also comes with modern features, such as an infotainment system. The original Rav4 EV doesn’t even have a way to tell the driver the remaining range, but its still impressive that some are on the road to this day.

Find a used Toyota Rav4 EV 

used bmw i8

Remember the 1980’s movie “Twins”, where Arnold Schwarzenneger and Danny DeVito were brothers resulting from a genetic experiment? Well, think of the i3 as Danny and the i8 as Arnold. After you step in through the i8’s swan-wing doors, you can do 0-60 in 3.8 seconds and forget entirely that you’re in a plug-in hybrid.

The 357hp BMW i8 looks like a supercar from the future because that’s exactly what it is. It doesn’t compete with other hybrids, it competes with Audi’s R8, Porsche and other traditional supercars. The one shown here is the top-of-the-line Pure Impulse model that comes with exclusive features.

With plugins and hybrids projected to make up 7% of the global light vehicle market by 2020, we can expect steady growth in the used market. Even without the $7,500 federal tax credit (which only applies to new cars) you can still get a great deal on a used EV thanks to high depreciation. With improved battery technology and good factory warranties, diminished range becomes less of an issue. Therefore, if you’re looking to save money while getting your Al Gore on, it’d be wise to shop used.

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Check out our other articles: 

-Are hybrid cars worth it?

-Best cars for city driving 

-7 companies to launch driverless cars by 2020


Written by Tristan Cathers

Graphics by Sam Jackson

5 High-Tech Luxury Car Features That May Reach All Cars (CheapCarInsurance.net)

cheap car ins logoArticle by Aaron Crowe for CheapCarInsurance.net

Luxury cars are often used by automakers to test new features in the marketplace, and since the cars already come at a high price, adding new high-tech equipment that’s sold as an option package gives them a way to test it more in real life. “In 2018, backup cameras will be mandatory in all vehicles sold in the U.S. A few years back, that technology was only available as an additional option in luxury cars,” says Paul Nadjarian, CEO of Mojo Motors, an online automotive marketplace that tracks used car prices at dealerships. [keep reading]

The Most Durable Automobiles on U.S. Roads (Wall St. Cheat Sheet)

WSCS Blog LogoArticle by Justin Lloyd-Miller for Wall St. Cheat Sheet

Automotive shopping and research resource Mojo Motors recently conducted a study to seek out what cars still made good buys with the highest mileage in their respective classes.

“We analyzed almost 300,000 vehicles on Mojo Motors from the model years 2002 to 2012 to find the highest mileage used vehicles,” the site said. [keep reading]

Here’s How Gasoline Taxes Stack Up State By State (Wall St. Cheat Sheet)

WSCS Blog LogoArticle by Justin Lloyd-Miller for Wall St. Cheat Sheet

For many states, taxes on gasoline and diesel fuel are an important source of revenue for supporting road and infrastructure programs. Most road work and bridge repair is largely funded by money raised from taxes on gasoline, both at the federal and state level. The federal government imposes a tax that amounts to about $0.18 per gallon. The money raised through this specific tax is used to finance major repairs to interstate highways and bridges, as well as roads through national parks and other public infrastructure. Recently, the issues surrounding the desperate state of the nation’s road and bridge network have led many to believe that a tax hike might be in order to address the crumbling roads, freeways, and bridges unless another solution is proposed. [keep reading]

Cheapest States To Buy a Used Car (About.com)

about-logo-croppedArticle by Keith Griffin for About.com

The cheapest states to buy a used car don’t always have to do with the price of the car. A new study shows what it costs for registering a used car will significantly impact your bottom line. Mojo Motors has studied what it costs to register a used car across the United States. There are significant differences in registration fees and sales taxes. As the site points out, “Once those costs are added into the final price, you might be thousands over budget!” [keep reading]

Used Hyundai Quality Called into Question? (TorqueNews)

TorqueNews LogoArticle by Keith Griffin for TorqueNews

TorqueNews reported, 3 Hyundais are tops in initial quality: the 2014 Genesis, 2014 Elantra and 2014 Accent. Contrast that against a report at UsedCars.About.com on the 10 least reliable used car brands. It quotes a Mojo Motors study that says, “Like Buick and Kia, two brands that also make this list, stick to their newer models from 2010 and onward for something that holds its value a little longer. [keep reading]

10 Least Reliable Used Car Brands (About.com)

about-logo-croppedArticle by Keith Griffin for About.com

Recently, MojoMotors.com posted its list of the 10 most reliable used car brands. Now it has taken the data used to compile that list to create its list of the 10 least reliable used cars. According to the site, “We used the same analysis of 500,000+ cars model years 1995 to 2014, listed for sale on Mojo Motors to determine the average selling price depending on a vehicle’s mileage,” said Michael Milstein, Business Intelligence Manager at Mojo Motors. [keep reading]

Mojo Motors Most Reliable Used Car Brands (About.com)

about-logo-croppedArticle by Keith Griffin for About.com

I’m going to do something a little different in what I think is going to be my last blog post for About.com. No, I’m not going away but the blogs are starting in June so I wanted to praise MojoMotors.com for its good marketing efforts. [keep reading]

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